Research Tips

January 15, 2009
Keeping your teeth healthy is essential for long term health. Always rinse your mouth with water after eating high sugar or high acid foods (like fruits, sodas, and sports drinks).
American Dental Association


January 20, 2009
Chewing sugarless gum benefits dental health. There also is evidence that chewing gum enhances brain function, possibly by increasing blood flow to the brain.
Br J Psychol. 2008 May;99(Pt 2):293-306. Epub 2007 Jul 24.


January 29, 2009
Dental problems may cause problems with chewing raw and al dente cooked vegetables. Eating well-cooked vegetables is better than eating none at all.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Jan;103(1):61-6


February 7, 2009
Older people with dentures or dental problems may have difficulty chewing meats. Therefore to meet protein needs, consume high protein foods like eggs, cottage cheese, tender fish, ground meat, and protein drinks.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jan;87(1):150-5


April 20, 2009
Hair loss is often the unavoidable consequence of aging. However, hair thinning is sometimes a sign of inadequate iron in the diet. Physicians who specialize in treating hair thinning prefer to see the index of body iron stores (ferritin) at a level greater than 70 ng/ml.
Clin Exp Dermatol. 2002 Jul;27(5):396-404.


June 1, 2009
More than 300 species of bacteria naturally live in the mouth. Some of these bacteria convert sugar into acids that gradually dissolve and erode tooth enamel. Foods that stimulate saliva flow can protect teeth by helping to flush acids out of the mouth.
J Am Dent Assoc. 2008 May;139 Suppl:18S-24S.


August 10, 2009
Rinsing your mouth with water after eating foods high in sugar or acid is a habit that can promote long-term dental health. Common foods that fit into these categories include sweets, sweet or tart fruits, fruit drinks, sodas (regular and diet), and sports drinks.
American Dental Association


December 30, 2009
During this season of many sweet treats, don't forget your dental health. Remember to rinse your mouth with water after eating high sugar or high acid foods (like fruits, sodas, candies, and sports drinks).
American Dental Association


January 18, 2010
The health of someone's hair is often a reflection of the adequacy of their diet. Hair thinning is sometimes a sign of inadequate iron in the diet.
Eur J Dermatol. 2007 Nov-Dec;17(6):507-12.


January 29, 2010
Older people often have dental challenges that prevent them from eating raw and lightly cooked vegetables. Eating well-cooked vegetables is definitely better than eating none at all.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Jan;103(1):61-6.


April 21, 2010
Many things can cause hair thinning and hair loss. One possible cause is inadequate iron in the diet. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can disrupt normal hair growth.
Clin Exp Dermatol. 2002 Jul;27(5):396-404.


June 4, 2010
You may be able to prevent dental caries and periodontal gum disease simply by making sure to consume all your essential nutrients.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 May;103(5):615-25.


June 21, 2010
There are a variety of potential causes for a woman to experience hair thinning and loss. Research indicates that poor iron nutrition is one of the more common causes.
Acta Dermatovenerol Croat. 2009;17(4):279-84.


July 11, 2010
Physicians studying female hair loss report that many cases improve with iron supplementation even when initial blood values for iron status are within normally acceptable ranges.
Acta Dermatovenerol Croat. 2009;17(4):279-84.


October 13, 2010
Hair loss in women is often caused by a diet that is too low in iron and the amino acid lysine. Rich sources of lysine include poultry, fish, and lean red meat. Red meat also is a good source of iron.
Clin Exp Dermatol. 2002 Jul;27(5):396-404.


November 21, 2010
Older individuals who wear dentures tend to consume fewer servings of fruits and vegetables than those with teeth. Food service for older people should include soft foods and juices rich in carotenoids and vitamin C.
J Public Health Dent. 2009 Fall;69(4):207-16.


January 3, 2011
Excessive hair loss in women is often thought to be strictly related to emotional or physiological stress. However, there is increasing evidence that low iron stores are strongly associated with hair loss in women who are free of systemic inflammation and other underlying disorders.
Acta Dermatovenerol Croat. 2009;17(4):279-84.


February 20, 2013
Researchers are now able to determine which bacteria were present in the dental plaque of prehistoric human skeletons. Analysis of how the types of bacteria present in dental plaque have changed with the advent of modern diets helps to explain why dental decay has become increasingly common.
Nature Genetics. February 2013. [Epub ahead of print]


September 15, 2015
Smoking and Tooth Loss: There are many good reasons to not smoke or to quit smoking if you do smoke. Along with increased risk of cancer and heart disease, research now indicates that smoking greatly increases the risk of losing teeth.
J Dent Res. 2015 Aug 4. [Epub ahead of print]


July 27, 2016
Mercury Toxicity in Skin Products: Most people are aware that it is important to avoid over-consumption of foods high in mercury, a toxic heavy metal. Now, FDA is warning consumers about skin products that can deliver dangerous amounts of mercury into the body through the skin. The most common mercury-containing products are “anti-aging” or “skin lightening” products made outside the U.S. If there is no ingredient list or if the list contains the words “mercurous chloride,” “calomel,” “mercuric,” “mercurio,” or “mercury,” FDA recommends that you stop using the product immediately.
FDA Consumer Health Information. July 2016.


October 15, 2016
Hair Loss and Nutrient deficiencies: Hair loss in women is often caused by a diet that is too low in iron and the amino acid lysine. Rich sources of lysine include poultry, fish, and lean red meat. Red meat also is a good source of iron.
Clin Exp Dermatol. 2002 Jul;27(5):396-404.


November 19, 2016
Nutrition for Denture Wearers: Older individuals who wear dentures tend to consume fewer servings of fruits and vegetables than those with teeth. Food service for older people should include soft foods and juices rich in carotenoids and vitamin C.
J Public Health Dent. 2009 Fall;69(4):207-16.